March 24, 2008

Dramz! Opposition To Opposition

The Facebook group in opposition of the Barnes and Noble possibly coming to Raymond and Collegview now has it's own opposing group. What about the B&N employees? has been formed.

"Why do small companies have a greater right to exist than big ones?" the group asks in its "description."

For the record, our "Opposition" post is the second most popular Mads post of all time. This is clearly an important issue to you guys.

26 comments:

Anonymous said...

hahaha this group is hilarz

Matt said...

From most of the people I have talked to, it seems that generally people are more angry at the location of the new bookstore than the fact that it is a Barnes & Noble. Yes, most people don't like that a B&N will disrupt local business, and I agree. But really, moving the bookstore off campus is a huge hassle for students. I feel like it was a pretty big oversight by whoever made the final decision to move the bookstore. Though it is important to interact with the community, in the case of a CAMPUS bookstore, the needs of the students should come first.

zack miller '10 said...

I'm sorry, but I really don't see how moving the bookstore is a major inconvenience to most of the students. While I'm uneasy about the idea of continuing to do business with Barnes & Noble, it doesn't seem like it will be a problem to have the bookstore located elsewhere (students at city schools do it all the time!)

The only really legitimate argument that I could think of against moving the bookstore to a better location that will serve locals as well as ourselves and provide more space for amenities and entertainment is that it will be a hindrance to students with limited mobility who would actually be inconvenienced by a farther bookstore. I'm hoping that the school will address this issue, especially since what I've heard from other students here about disability services has been less than stellar, but otherwise I think the move itself is a good idea for the school.

Anonymous said...

though it will be slightly less convenient to have the bookstore be off campus, i agree with the decision for two reasons. first of all, it opens the possibility for an exciting new lounge space where the current store is. second, it will dramatically remake the image of the local community, such that vassar will look like it's in a much nicer area. i think it's important for vassar's surrounds to match the beauty of the school. and it's not like it's SO far away, especially for joss/jewett residents.

andrew bennett said...

Matt,

If you actually look at the location of the Juliet building on an aerial map, you will find that it is not that far away. In fact, Joss is much closer to the Juliet than it is to the College Center. While Strong residents will certainly have to walk farther to get to the bookstore, the actual impact on most students in terms of distance is negligible.

Also, any distance issue will be alleviated by Vassar's intention to require the new bookstore to be open longer hours than is feasible for the current bookstore. If the bookstore is open longer hours, I think that the change will be beneficial to students.

Anonymous said...

While I might not agree with the decision to have B&N run the store, I think it has the potential to be a great community space. Kids from the area could go there to read some of their favorite books afterschool and on the weekends. I would love to help out at story hours or go to events there with residents from the community!

Why is it that Vassar students will jump on the train to go to New York City, which is an hour and a half away, but they find it difficult to walk across the street to buy books? Let's be serious! It seems like the problem is not so much about the distance, but about the fear of Vassar students to go out into Poughkeepsie when they are not "volunteering." And in no way do I mean to belittle the feelings of those who will legitimately be affected by the change in distance of the bookstore.

Anonymous said...

it's also a lot further from Cushing than the college center is...

Anonymous said...

I can't WAIT for a big wonderful B&N!

Anonymous said...

yep, and a lot farther from main too!

Anonymous said...

HEY YALL if you're so freakin' in favor of B&N then why don't you JOIN the freakin' GROUP!

Anonymous said...

closer to davison, raymond, jewett and joss... plus i'm willing to trade some distance-related convenience for the convenience of longer hours and greater selection.

Anonymous said...

do people know if there will really be a starbucks inside? how amazing would that be?? finally, we'd be able to get decent coffee + pastries.

andrew bennett said...

6:22 - I can't imagine that there will be a Starbucks if B&N is chosen.

Anonymous said...

i know b&n has a partnership with starbucks. that would be pretty cool. maybe even if the starbucks doesn't go inside the bookstore, vassar could solicit the company to open one up on collegeview.

zack miller '10 said...

That's right. Instead of supporting an independent cafe with a really cool atmosphere and that supports local artists, we should help drive them out of business (not that they need much help at that) so we can pay two dollars more for something I can get in any other town in America.

Sorry, but gunning for convenience in the interest of the consumer is one thing. Replacing an outstanding local business with a mediocre chain is something else entirely. I understand that you might really like Starbucks, and there's nothing whatsoever wrong with that. Maybe you even prefer it to coffee at the Cubbyhole (if you've ever been there). However, I would hope, perhaps foolishly, that if the students here acknowledged the fact that we are a part of the Arlington community, we might embrace the town we live in, flaws and all, as something to which we have responsibilities that extend beyond our self-interest.

This isn't directed just at 8:10, by the way.

Anonymous said...

i'm appalled by how short-sighted some of these comments are

Anonymous said...

nothin against starbucks really, but the crafted kup is real yummy

Anonymous said...

I get what Zach's saying, but I still think this area would approve with just a smattering of bigger businesses. There's nothing wrong with competition. If consumers in the area favor Starbucks over the Cubbyhole, then let the Cubbyhole disappear. If the reverse is true, let Starbucks disappear. But I see absolutely no reason to say "Oh a business is local and therefore it must be protected." That's called protectionism, and it's not how an economy grows.

Anonymous said...

they should bring me a grocery store. or a movie theater

i can buy my books online but some services just don't work that way!

Anonymous said...

10:23 you seriously crack me up. what are you taking intro to micro? hilarious.

Anonymous said...

Hey bitchy Vassar kids: this town doesn't deserve the stigma you decided to attach to it. The campus is surrounded by fucking suburbs, for Christ's sake.

Juliet's wasn't ours to take, and my mind is blown (BLOWN) when I read shit about Starbucks or Barnes & Noble replacing it. No wonder Poughkeepsie resents us.

Anonymous said...

10:38 - Actually, I'm a double major in urban studies and economics, writing a thesis on urban development. I know it's "cool" to blame big evil corporations for taking over the world, but if you look more closely at the facts and the data, most corporations do NOT hurt local businesses in the way that many on the left claim. If a business needs to be "protected" from competition, that means that competitors can offer comparable goods at a lower price. This benefits residents. The only people it hurts are the small handful of people working at local businesses who will feel increased competition. Famous case studies of urban sprawl have been done in the suburbs of Rochester, San Francisco, White Plains, and Toledo. I would encourage people to read these studies, which focus on hard economic data rather than ideology.

I'll add that a double major hardly makes me an expert on corporatism in America, but I have studied this data a lot, especially in the last couple months. The idea that a Starbucks or a Barnes and Noble would hurt this community is absolutely false. It would hurt a very, very limited number of people and likely benefit many more by raising property values within five years. This, in turn, leads to higher taxes, better teachers, better schools, more cops, etc. etc...

Saying that competition from any business is bad (assuming they are operating within the bounds of the law) is the economic equivalent of idiocy. So yes, 10:38, I did take micro economics my freshman year. Maybe you should too.

10:23

Anonymous said...

why do people keep talking about improving the area like it's the fucking ghetto? arlington is a suburb, stop acting like there's a war going on on raymond ave.

Anonymous said...

well i don't know, the few blocks to the north of the college are not too bad (on the way to the acrop diner) but main street is pretty sleazy.

Anonymous said...

10:23
"That's called protectionism, and it's not how an economy grows."

1. you presume that growth is good. is economic growth good? guess it depends who it's good for, which, to your credit, you did address
2. protectionism. see: US, steel, farm subsidies.

Anonymous said...

10:23, i would encourage you to turn on, tune in but most importantly drop out before you are done with that thesis. your friend,
10:38