August 29, 2010

How Did Everything Become So Old?

Most of the Class of 2011 moved in yesterday and probably realized, damn, how did I get so old? In honor of this revelation, we've compiled a list of other things whose ages we find hard to believe. (By the way, here is an article that mentions Vassar on how our generation has sought nostalgia way before previous generations did.)

1. Disney Animated Movies. It seems like just yesterday that we were watching those VHS tapes in the clamshell cases. But those movies are clearly a thing of the past, as evident by current animated films and disappointing box offices figures for The Princess and the Frog. The Little Mermaid came out 21 years ago, Beauty and the Beast is 19 years, and Aladdin 18 years. No wonder the technology - and the values presented in the films - seems antiquated.

[via IMDB]
2. Macaulay Culkin. The kid who got left alone and thwarted the bad guys not once but twice turned 30 years old last week. "Mom? Dad? Uncle Frank? Buzz?"

3. Harry Potter. Remember when the first book came out and it actually got kids interested in reading? That was already 13 years ago. Harry turned 11 years old in the first book, but technically the books take place in the 90s, so Harry would actually be 30 years old.

[via Blogue]

4. Nickelodean shows. There is a whole subculture devoted to the Nickelodean shows that we grew up with, even before the time of Cat-Dog and Rocket Power and certainly before current shows like iCarly and Zoey 101. We see the change as happening when Tommy got a little sister in one of those Rugrats movies. Or maybe when the kid from Pete and Pete grew up and joined the cast of All That. Or when Clarissa became Sabrina (and now MJH has a new show on ABC Family with one of the Lawrence brothers?). The Rugrats series is 19 years old, which means the main characters would all be about that age. Pete and Pete started 20 years ago, Clarissa Explains It All 19 years ago, and All That 16 years ago.

5. DVDs. It seems like not very long ago that we were buying an expensive and mysterious machine known as a DVD player. Yet, incredibly, DVDs have now been around for 14 years. How long until DVDs, like CDs, become obsolete?

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