February 2, 2011

"Chocolate" Documentary And Filmmaker Presentation Today

Several departments are collaborating to screen The Dark Side of Chocolate today (Wednesday, 2/2) at 5:30pm in the Rosenwald theater (Drama and Film building). A short discussion with director U. Roberto Romano will follow.



Here is more information:
"Come join us for a special screening of this controversial new documentary, an exposĂ© of continuing child trafficking and slavery in the international cocoa industry. Shot with hidden camera footage in Mali, the Ivory Coast, and outside the corporate headquarters of NestlĂ© in Vevey, Switzerland, The Dark Side of Chocolate raises profound and troubling questions about globalization, economic competition, human rights, and colonialism in the trade and production of one of the most widely traded agricultural products in the world – chocolate.

"Now, ten years after consumers around the world were first outraged to discover that child labor and slavery, trafficking, and other abuses existed on cocoa farms in the Ivory Coast, and chocolate companies, concerned governments and NGOs spent millions of dollars in an effort to eradicate child labor and trafficking, The Dark Side of Chocolate asks the chilling question: Has anything changed?
 

"U. Roberto Romano is one of the most respected human rights filmmakers in the world. Through his films Stolen Childhoods and Death of a Slave Boy, Mr. Romano has emerged as one of the foremost voices documenting the continuing practice of illegal child labor and trafficking around the globe. He has appeared before Congress as a speaker on Department of Labor panels (alongside Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis) and to promote the CARE bill.  He was also a featured speaker for the Global Forum on Human Trafficking and recently participated at a training event on forced child labor sponsored by US Immigration and Customs Enforcement. He has appeared as a special guest on Nightline with Ted Koppel and Newsnight with Aaron Brown and has taught graduate courses on documentary filmmaking at both Columbia and NYU."

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